TIL 24: FYWV 5

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My notes on the book, Finding Your Writer’s Voice, by Thaisa Frank and Dorothy Wall. Working my way through the first part, ‘Voice’, as one of three main topics covered in my take on the September Learning Challenge.

Chapter 13 – Who’s Speaking? Voice and Character

As you ‘play with the chorus of voices in your head’, you can discover the amazing duality of projecting your voice like a ventriloquist, of being you and entirely not you at the same time as you inhabit the character you are projecting. Pay attention the next time the voice crops up, really interrogate the character and get a life story. When you do this, do you become the character, or do you sit across from the character and interview them? This might be a hint as to whether you should write in the first or third person.

Playing with personas, dramatic masks, can help with voice, especially if you let one push a characteristic to the extreme. Try experimenting, e.g. a voice of someone who holds an opposite view to one of your own deep-held beliefs, or a character who would actually carry out a relatiation fantasy you’ve harboured. Take a bland/superficial characteristic of your own which you dislike, and make it a big part of a character, or find a character who both repells but still rather intrigues you.

Personae can often present as caricatures initially. Don’t let this put you off – they might just need some time to grow. Try putting a cardboard character into a quiet setting, see what comes out about them.

Chapter 14 – Capturing the Inner Critic

No writer will be unfamiliar with the inner critic – the poisonous voice that tells us we’re not good enough and might as well give up. But why not turn the critic into a character, just like any other voice?

Channel your critic’s energy into your story, especially as it tends to rear its head at the most crucial moments.

Even if you think your critic has a good point to make, the harsh and nasty way you talk to yourself is never helpful. If you can find a way to constructively use that voice, fine; otherwise [cast a riddikulus spell on it ;)].

Chapter 15 – Learning to Spot the Imposter

“Noises that may sound pretty, may be executed with sophistication, but are not connected to one’s inner spirit.”

A fake voice can cover up nerves in a writer, just as in a singer. Relying too much on technique, slipping into an academic or ‘literary’ voice – writing from the head instead of the gut. Saying things like “His words set off defensive signals in my mind” instead of the direct “I was furious.” Detachment is deadly for a writer.

Your imposter voice might just be you settling into writing – you can learn to work through it. Or it might be a response to your inner critic – over embellishing to make yourself ‘more writerly’. Simpler is usually better. Spot the imposter voice by reading your work aloud, or exaggerating the tendency when you see it e.g. if your writing is too academic, try writing in overblown psychological jargon.

The good news is that imposter voices are like costumes which can be worn by your characters.

Suggested exercises include: letting a minor character be the main character in a short story; set a quiet and demure character against a loud, brash one and let them talk about writing, family, anything; remove all adjectives and adverbs from a piece of your writing – what difference does it make?

Find the earlier parts of the ‘series’ here:

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